We now live in a world where technology is evolving at a faster rate than ever before. We’re now able to purchase goods with a tap of a finger, listen to music via air pods and heat the house before arriving home and it won’t stop there!

With technology continuing to advance, the future of the theory test remains to be seen, but here are some key factors we believe will certainly provoke change.

User Behaviour

The way in which we consume media has dramatically changed over the past 10 years. Here we have seen mobile and tablet devices overtake PC, with people spending on average over 3 hours a day using them. Not only that, tablets are slowly being implemented in all aspects of daily life e.g. schools, deliveries, restaurants, retailers and even on driving lessons. Our research suggests that 50.48% prefer to learn on a mobile or tablet device, which highlights that the theory test may soon need to follow suit.

Virtual Reality

The introduction of the VR headsets has ultimately transformed the way we engage with media and places the user in the centre of the experience. This technology has allowed gamers to interact with gaming content more than ever before, allowing them to physically participate in games as themselves rather than a character. This could potentially transform the way learner drivers take their tests as it gives them the option to react in real world situations. For example, the hazard perception part of the test could potentially benefit as it would show examiners the learners ability to react to hazards on the road and their general awareness of what was going on.

Autonomous Cars

Autonomous cars, once a futuristic concept is now becoming a reality, with leading manufacturers already releasing their concept cars. The introduction of these type of cars will potentially remove the need for a human driver, as the technology will enable the car to be self-sufficient. Popular manufacturers like Ford and Jaguar have recently released their concept car models which reveal drivers will have the option to give up control and let the vehicle take them from A to B. We think this will be one of the biggest influencers in changing what is tested using the theory test. Self-driving cars may mean that the focus of the theory test will centre around the maintenance of the vehicle, creating an understanding of how to identify warning signs and how to resolve them. However, the introduction of these cars still remains uncertain as a study by Fleet News suggests a third of motorists failing to see any advantage of automated vehicles.

Despite the introduction of autonomous cars feeling light years away, changes in the theory test may be happening sooner than we think. The DVSA have recently appealed for participants to join a theory test focus group and have rolled out various surveys for people who have recently taken their theory test.

What other changes do you think could affect the theory test?

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